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THE PLAN ISSUE 126

THE PLAN ISSUE 126

$29.00
ssue 126 of The Plan opens with an editorial by Kimberly Dowdell entitled “Designing for Life.” In it, she looks at how architecture is a fundamental ingredient for supporting both the environment and society’s most marginalized communities. Next, by reviewing several important examples, Michael Webb takes us on a tour through Moscow constructivism. This serves as an introduction to his look at the restoration of the Narkomfin Building by Ginzburg Architects. In our Design column, we look at Connected, a design challenge in which important designers worked remotely, basing their project on their experience with lockdown. The event was organized by the AHEC as part of 2020’s London Design Festival. The Interior column looks at a unique project by Benedetto Camerana in Turin, where open spaces and glazed surfaces have injected new life into Torre Littoria. China-based studio Zhu-Pei has designed a contemporary museum that references an ancient past to form a focal point for rebalancing all the different elements at work in its location. The Architecture section of this issue is entirely devoted to Italian architecture. Archea Associati has rethought the concept of the sports stadium, breathing new life into the architecture of Tirana in a polychromatic project that forms an urban-scale landmark. Following a painstaking design approach in which historical memory embraces the future, deamicisarchitetti has transformed the morphology of the historical balcony houses of downtown Milan into a more contemporary courtyard-style design. Studio Architetti Mar, Galeazzo Architetti Associati, and Pool Engineering collaborated on the project for Padua University’s new Polo Umanistico (Humanities hub), producing a design that, although poised between history and contemporaneity, maintains a formal and substantial compositional balance throughout. Rome- based studio Alvisi Kirimoto has put its name to a social housing development that harmonizes the urban macro-scale with the domestic micro-scale, all in the name of wellbeing and quality of life. Finally, with its elegant, sensitive reinterpretation of a historical Sicilian country home, Iraci Architetti has turned a restoration project into a work of art.


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